A Doodle is a Doodle – 3

The picture below is one of the doodles I did in the late nineties. I was in a waiting room of a doctor's office. A Dr. Ellen there, said it reminded her of skin cells under a microscope.

The next picture are actual skin cells as seen under a microscope. I found it on the net somewhere but, unfortunately, forgot to get the name of the medical site. I thought it interesting.

I did not draw this one. It is actually what you see under a microscope.

The next two pictures are mock up drawings, or sketches, if you will. Sorry for the quality as my scanner is not working properly.

I had to do the mock-ups when taking a color class at the university. This was for our final project and the instructor wanted documentation and notes of our thought process. We had to do an installation piece and become part of the work. They were all done in large appliance boxes which were our canvases, so to speak, and we had to sit inside the box as if we were part of it. I really wish I'd taken photos of everyone's project. They were all so different and exciting. Mine was about the two halves of me. One half being calm and relaxed and the other half being chaotic and disorganized. I actually painted half my face and my left arm lavendar acrylic paint and wore a lavendar leotard. I also painted the palm of my right hand red……for stop the madness. Somewhere, there is a slide of my final project. I have yet to find it.


My scanner is about to be thrown out. It either puts shadows where there are none or does not scan in the entire picture. Getting these scanned in with most of the picture took several tries. The printer part of it stopped working a few months back. There will be a replacement soon. Hopefully! I apologize for the smudge-like appearance on the two pictures above. They are not on the originals. Well, maybe a little but the scanner picked them up very strongly. I tried in vain with adjustments but they all looked bad. Just wanted to give you an idea of the fun installation art project.

Last, but not least, is another master drawing I did as part of my learning experience at school. I could not find a photo of the original. It is by Andrea Del Sarto. You can read more about him on wiki.

If anyone is interested, here is my first post on doodles. And this is the 2nd post about doodles.

About pam

I am retired from real 9 to 5 jobs. I do my artwork and occasionally write poetry. In September 2010, I moved to Fargo, ND after spending 60 years in Phoenix, Arizona. Now, five years later, July 2015, I'm back in Arizona. And yes, I love the heat!
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56 Responses to A Doodle is a Doodle – 3

  1. L2D2 says:

    You must have seen a picture of skin cells and you unconsciously doodled your memory Pam. Good job at that. All of these are good. I always enjoy your art work. Am waiting for Chuck to come along and find hidden images.

  2. Unasia says:

    Your artwork Pam, is just wonderful. There is no reservation in it, and I like that a great deal.

  3. mebemon says:

    I like last pic

  4. Stardancer says:

    Great drawings, Pam.:up:

  5. edwardpiercy says:

    Yes, cells. Or dried blood came to mind also. Thanks for the exhibition! And as was mentioned the Del Sarto drawing is great. :up: :up:My best to your mom.

  6. PainterWoman says:

    Linda: Thanks. Nope. Never saw anything under a microscope unless you count Sophomore biology when you have to cut on frogs and look at it under a microscope. I must have blocked that out because I don't remember that day at all. Makes me shudder to think about it. Clance: Thanks. One day soon, I'll get my mojo back and be as spontaneous as I was. The little things I'm working on now are way too constricting.Kim: Thank you. I like that drawing too. It's more finished. The others I consider just doodles…or sketches.Star: Thank you.Ed: Thanks and your're welcome.Ooops, I better elaborate more in my post. The cell doodle is from 1998 when my mom was doing the chemo. She passed away in 99.

  7. PainterWoman says:

    Yeah, dW, she had it for 7 years and had 4 or 5 different types of chemo. The last two were experimental but she was willing to be the guinea pig. Long story on that.Have never read any Thurber. Will have to look him up next time I'm at the used book store.

  8. derWandersmann says:

    Makes ya wonder … she went through all that mizzuble chemo, and died anyway. Seems like that game wasn't worth the candle. Sorry about your mom, Pam.The doodle is a good one … skin cells … yeah, OK … I was thinking fat cells, but skin cells will do.Pam, have you ever read James Thurber's description of his biology course at Ohio State? It's great Thurber, and funny.

  9. debplatt says:

    Hope you can find the slide of your installation piece. The mock-up and your description were very intriguing. The portrait sketch reminded me of one of the sketches of the Renaissance masters. πŸ™‚ The top sketch does look like a tissue slide. Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    she went through all that mizzuble chemo, and died anyway.

    We all die anyway, no matter what doctors do for us. Medical treatment may improve the quality of life, or it may extend life. Sometimes it does both, sometimes neither.

  10. ellinidata says:

    a wonderful chain of art, by looking your doodles I get the feeling that your thoughts were only positive, nor anger, no agony, no fear. Like you were sending her positive thoughts all the time during your waiting ….When I did take early childhood psychology in college ,we learned how to detect early on a bi-polar child. Isn't doodling an amazing mirror of our inner thoughts? :love:

  11. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    del Sarto was a Renaissance painter … a pretty good one,

    His drawings and paintings were remarkable! I'll have to look at my art books again to see his work. The wiki article has a few of them. Originally posted by Dacotah:

    Love the last one best.

    Thanks Carol. I'm partial to that one too. It's a more traditional drawing.

  12. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by ellinidata:

    I get the feeling that your thoughts were only positive, nor anger, no agony, no fear. Like you were sending her positive thoughts all the time during your waiting ….

    That's a good way of putting Angeliki. I may have been. In a way it was very calming for both of us. She tired of talking and would just watch me doodle.Originally posted by ellinidata:

    Isn't doodling an amazing mirror of our inner thoughts?

    Yes! Hmmmmm…..maybe I shouldn't show a few of the doodles I made while waiting in another situation.

  13. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by debplatt:

    Hope you can find the slide of your installation piece.

    Me too Deb. It'll probably show up in an unlikely place….such as stuck in a book or a box of notes. For one of the installation, a woman borrowed her husband's army camouflage suit, had tree branches stuck all inside this gigantic box, moss hanging down, and her holding a huge fake snake. She went to a lot of work making the inside of her box look like a jungle. The box must have been from an industrial size freezer. Mine was for a washer…much smaller.Another one, a student made herself a Magritte painting. She fit a small box around her head, covered her face with makeup mixed with sand. Inside the box was painted like sky and the beach. I really liked hers.

  14. derWandersmann says:

    Originally posted by debplatt:

    The portrait sketch reminded me of one of the sketches of the Renaissance masters.

    Deb, Andrea del Sarto was a Renaissance painter … a pretty good one, too.

  15. Dacotah says:

    Love the last one best. πŸ™‚

  16. studio41 says:

    interesting that your doodle had something to do w/ the human body- when your mother was going through her illness…I think the master drawing is incredible. and I like how you accomplished the eyes, lips, & hair.

  17. SittingFox says:

    Love the drawing that shows two halves of you :up: and the master sketch is great. My doodles are usually foxes or cougar pawprints for some reason :whistle:

  18. Dacotah says:

    You are welcome Pam πŸ™‚

  19. Des An says:

    You did a great job in drawing the skin cells.it really looked complicated:yes:

  20. gdare says:

    Your doodles looks artistic. Mine not πŸ˜†

  21. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by Des An:

    You did a great job in drawing the skin cells.it really looked complicated

    Thank you Des. If I'd been drawing what was actually seen under a microscope….now that would have been complicated. The doodles are easy because they are from my imagination. Originally posted by gdare:

    Your doodles looks artistic. Mine not

    Ah, but Darko, all doodles are interesting I think. As Angeliki said, they are a mirror to our inner thoughts. And feelings too I might add.

  22. PainterWoman says:

    πŸ˜† One of my instructors always said it was the nose. I ended up walking out of his class after he painted on my painting. I CAN have a rebellious streak once in a while. He was a buffoon anyway.

  23. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by studio41:

    interesting that your doodle had something to do w/ the human body

    It is, especially because it wasn't my plan. They started out as just random marks on paper and developed slowly as the hours passed. In fact, it's only been in the last year or two that I have begun naming them. Originally posted by studio41:

    I like how you accomplished the eyes, lips, & hair.

    Thank you. One of the hardest parts to get correct is the space between the nose and mouth. I always forget the name of it. Another hard part is getting the mouth correct.

  24. PainterWoman says:

    At the bottom of the above post, I have added links to my two previous doodle posts. I could probably make doodle posts once a week for five years!

  25. derWandersmann says:

    Originally posted by PainterWoman:

    Another hard part is getting the mouth correct.

    It has been said that the definition of a portrait is "a picture of a person in which there is something wrong about the mouth".

  26. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by SittingFox:

    Love the drawing that shows two halves of you

    Thank you. I wish I could find the last mock up which was more completed and more true to the finished project. That, and the slide the instructor made for each of us.

  27. debplatt says:

    Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    Deb, Andrea del Sarto was a Renaissance painter … a pretty good one, too.

    Thanks. I didn't realize… :doh:

  28. daxonmacs says:

    Woah, really love that del Sarto job you did! Great!Doodles are fun, used to do a lot of them during classes.It's like auto Γ©criture, the more you let go, the more surprising and, usually, the better the result.

  29. BabyJay99 says:

    :up: πŸ˜‰

  30. NLDH says:

    Interesting the skin cells under a microscope doodle, Pam. Love your post. I doodled too, especially when I lost my interest during lectures. My doodles used to be the abstract shapes, flowers, or stars.

  31. studio41 says:

    Originally posted by PainterWoman:

    One of the hardest parts to get correct is the space between the nose and mouth.

    I'll have to remember that when I find a picture I'd started of my dad- it was going well, then…

  32. daxonmacs says:

    ..he grew a nose and a mouth? :p

  33. studio41 says:

    well… in the wrong place…

  34. PainterWoman says:

    Thanks Danny. I agree, doodles are fun. Wish I'd kept all the ones I did years ago. I also agree that the more you let go, the more surprising the result.Leazz: :happy: to see you.L.D.: I used to doodle during art history lectures. Especially during the slide presentations. I'd sketch what was on the slide then take notes on the back. Still have a bunch of those 3 x 5 cards they were on.Jill and Danny: It was bugging me I couldn't remember what that area is called so looked it up. From Wiki Answers: "Parafiltrum is the name of the skin between the nose and the upper lip. Philtrum is the name of the vertical two ridges in the center of the parafiltrum."I can now officially say the buffoon professor was WRONG! He was calling the space the Philtrum.

  35. PainterWoman says:

    Thanks Harrie. Haven't doodled much lately as I've been diligently working on my home projects again. They WILL get done! Then I can be free to doodle to my heart's content.

  36. Harrrie says:

    I love doodles, and how they betray our subconcious, your doodles are amazing, and I love your drawing, it very much captures a real life.

  37. CultureSurfer says:

    Beautiful portrait, Pam! And your doodles are really cool and complex. Love the pics of you and Mia. Very cute! :flirt:

  38. PainterWoman says:

    Thanks Naomi. What you see of any of the doodles is only a part of the sheet. They are all done on 11 in. x 14 in. Canson drawing paper and the scanner only scans in about 8 x 10 I think. When I get a new camera, I'm hoping to take more photos of my work.

  39. Suntana says:

    Hidden images, Eh, Peppermint?::: Sigh ::: Awww Man! Try as I did, this time I can't find anything solid. There are a couple ALMOSTs:A Sports Bra and a Headless Vulture in the 1st Pic.Two Star Trek Emblems in the 3rd Pic. And something that reminds me of a B2 Stealth Bomber in the 4th Pic, but doesn't per se LOOK entirely like a B2 Stealth Bomber.The top of a Stegasaurus. Okay, that last one is reaching.

  40. Suntana says:

    Okay, Pam, I am an eensie, weensie bit confused.I get the part about you have to draw inside the box.And I can see the different sides depicted in the drawing.However, ARE those actually 4 or 5 sides on which you drew?Or did you just create the illusion of drawing on multiple sides?

  41. PainterWoman says:

    Carlos, you got as much imagination as I do. I see the headless vulture and the sports bras……don't know about the Star Trek emblems as I don't remember them…..and do not see the bomber. There could be a tail of the stegosaurus in the fourth one.I painted the entire inside of the box except for the part I sat on so it was 4 sections I painted. When I found the box, it had no top, so I turned it on its side for the opening to be towards the viewer. My scanner cut off part of the color picture. It took me several tries to get enough of it and the others as well. When I scanned the portrait drawing in first, it only scanned in half the face. Very strange things its doing. I'm ready to dump it because it no longer prints either. I wanted to buy a digital camera, but must get a new printer/scanner instead.

  42. studio41 says:

    Originally posted by PainterWoman:

    I can now officially say the buffoon professor

    πŸ˜€ :hat:

  43. derWandersmann says:

    Get the camera, Pam. Not only can you use it as a camera (DUH!), but you can photograph your documents, usually quite effectively, provided you take your time and learn how to light them properly. Also, you're not limited as to size. Just be sure to get a camera that has the highest resolution you can afford, and has a macro setting.A copy of Photoshop Elements is very helpful, too.

  44. CultureSurfer says:

    It's difficult to shoot photos of art, though, without losing some of the outer boarder of the art when you crop the pic down.

  45. derWandersmann says:

    Jeeze! Shoot a little extra!

  46. daxonmacs says:

    Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    Jeeze! Shoot a little extra!

    Remain calm, dear old friend. Think of your ticker πŸ˜€

  47. derWandersmann says:

    I had it fixed years ago, and my cholesterol figures scare the doctors because they're so low. I tell them to relax; there aren't many sabre-toothed tigers around here now, so I don't have to run away from them.

  48. derWandersmann says:

    No; cholesterol is a steroid which is burned up in the running away.

  49. daxonmacs says:

    Sabre-toothed tigers are low on cholesterol eh? πŸ˜€

  50. debplatt says:

    Originally posted by derWandersmann:

    No; cholesterol is a steroid which is burned up in the running away.

    It is cheering to learn that my high cholesterol levels are good for something. :coffee:

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