The Scroll

As promised in a previous post, here are some close ups of the scroll I have worked on. I actually started it almost three years ago and get it out every once in a while to dabble at it. This you have seen before with the self portrait.

Here’s a view from the opposite direction. The self-portrait is at the far end. You can also see I need to mow my grass.

Next to the self-portrait and the tree are three faces, all of which are copies of three paintings I have in my studio. Sorry the angle is off and you can see wrinkling of the paper. More drawing is called for on two of these faces.

Next to the three faces is the water scene. I’ll be adding more fish, shells and vegetation to this area. This section is about four feet wide. The others are about three.

Here is a closer view of the star fish.

Here is a closer view of a sea shell and two fish. These fish represent Pisces. The fish are done with cut pieces of magazine pages and glued on like a collage. Not sure if that was a good idea or not. The white you see is actually due to sun reflection on the shiny magazine paper.

About pam

I am retired from real 9 to 5 jobs. I do my artwork and occasionally write poetry. In September 2010, I moved to Fargo, ND after spending 60 years in Phoenix, Arizona. Now, five years later, July 2015, I'm back in Arizona. And yes, I love the heat!
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75 Responses to The Scroll

  1. L2D2 says:

    That goes for any antique, Deb. Antique furniture? Never restore it or strip it and refinish. True antique collectors want the original fixtures and finishes, even if to the eye of the uneducated, it looks old and broke down. And don't use furniture wax on it either.

  2. debplatt says:

    @Linda – Thanks for the tip on antiques as well.Here's a photo I used in a post on my dad's WWII experiences. It's a Japanese rifle with the emperor's chrysanthemum seal:I'm still not sure whether I'm keeping these or not. Had it not been for the "Pawnshop" show (and now you), I would have thought I needed to do something about the rust were I to try to sell it. Now I know I shouldn't try to do any "restoration" as I have come to realize that I don't know anything. 😛

  3. PainterWoman says:

    Here's a good link from our AZ Game & Fish, showing a picture and a description of the javelina. http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/urban_javelina.shtmlThey are a little bigger than Camie who is at 42 lbs, and actually are not a pig at all. Eh….maybe that's why I was so scared camping with my friend's family because all they talked about was how big the last year's kill was.

  4. debplatt says:

    Wild boars could also be referring to feral hogs, which can grow up to 300 pounds. See this article on feral hogs in the American state of Oklahoma.And here's Danny's blog post on them.

  5. edwardpiercy says:

    @ Linda.I've seen those new ones. They take both the .38+P or the .357. @ Pam.:lol: I can't help it, the phrase "wild boar hunting" just cracks me up.I take it those are those havalina things they have down there? A friend of mine had two German shepherds, and even they ran from those havalinas.

  6. edwardpiercy says:

    40-60 pounds, it says. Not very big. But then…they also say they travel in packs… :p 😆

  7. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by edwardpiercy:

    I take it those are those havalina things they have down there?

    Yes, and I have no idea how big they are as we never saw any. In zoos they aren't that big, in fact, the German Shepard is probably bigger. But then on someone's blog, I think it was Danny's (daxonmacs) where a picture was posted of a huge animal said to be a wild pig or boar. I don't know if the picture was photoshopped or not.

  8. edwardpiercy says:

    @ Deb.:)One more good reason not to live in Oklahoma. :p:lol:(Did you know that Brad Pitt was born in Oklahoma? Seriously.)

  9. L2D2 says:

    Wild boars are totally different from javalenas . I have seen javalenas running wild on Terlingua Ranch in West Texas. And hunting wild hogs is a big sport here in East Texas. We have a lot of them. Most are animals that escaped captivity or were pets and turned loose, and they have propagated and thrived in our East Texas woods. Wild boars are extremely dangerous (but also good eating). I know a lot of guys who hunt wild hogs.

  10. PainterWoman says:

    Deb, have you ever had that collection of guns appraised by a professional? And have you ever watched Antiques Roadshow? If they are ever in your city, it'd be cool to take a couple of your guns there. I love it when someone has some old thing from their attic or that they've bought at a garage sale for $5 and it ends up being worth $30,000 or more.

  11. edwardpiercy says:

    Wild hogs. There's a movie by that title. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0486946/

  12. PainterWoman says:

    Ed, that movie was cute and I enjoyed it. It wouldn't have been something I'd pay to go see, but saw it on a plane trip when it was still free to get the head phones. Now it's like $5 or something.

  13. edwardpiercy says:

    I thought it was a fun movie. But I'm like you, I'm glad I didn't have to pay for it.

  14. debplatt says:

    Originally posted by PainterWoman:

    Deb, have you ever had that collection of guns appraised by a professional?

    Well the gun shop where I am selling a portion of the hunting guns appraised them and set prices. I am familiar with the story of how my dad obtained the Japanese rifles and bayonets (which I wrote about here), and I currently don't have any plans to sell them. The guy at the gun shop told me that the value of the weapons is increased since the capture situation is known.Originally posted by PainterWoman:

    Deb, have you ever had that collection of guns appraised by a professional? And have you ever watched Antiques Roadshow? If they are ever in your city, it'd be cool to take a couple of your guns there.

    The vast majority of the hunting guns are relatively new. At some point I'll have to decide what to do with the few older guns. I've heard of the Antiques Roadshow, but I don't think I've ever seen it myself.

  15. debplatt says:

    Originally posted by 1bluebox:

    ! think i'll take a trip down south to visit mom and tell her thanks for being my mother!

    Sweet!

  16. 1bluebox says:

    another interesting blog post by pam! really enjoyed reading all the comments and where the discussion has gone is unique. only in the usa can we own and use our firearms by our choice — one of the basics of our constitution.i digress, sorry …. one of the last hunting trips i went on with my uncle involved me climbing a very small tree to escape a wild hog with giant tusks running full-speed my way. too bad for the beast that my uncle was such a good shot — dead in his tracks he was after one shot. that was enough to convince me i didn't like to hunt deer when there are feral hogs in the vicinity. scared the crap out of me and i think i was about twelve. i remember i was using a 22 rifle that day, but, missed the doe — good thing cause i probably would not have made a kill, just hurt the animal.i've shot a few handguns at the target range and have been thinking about taking the sport back up. my friend has a good collection of both handguns and rifles. he just recently traded for a browning rifle that is brand new and beautiful — i'll bet it has a kick to it!now to the scroll pam, you've got talent and i am also a fish (born in march). it will be here before we know it and another year will have passed since mom bore me. this year, i'm looking forward to my birthday! think i'll take a trip down south to visit mom and tell her thanks for being my mother!i'd like to suggest you not chop the roll even if it takes a lifetime to complete — kind of like an antique, you shouldn't mess with it until it is done. just my two cents worth. deborah.

  17. studio41 says:

    I love Eucalyptus…

  18. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by debplatt:

    (which I wrote about here),

    I have just been there and commented. Loved reading his story.

  19. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by 1bluebox:

    another interesting blog post by pam

    Thanks Deborah. Originally posted by 1bluebox:

    involved me climbing a very small tree to escape a wild hog with giant tusks running full-speed my way

    Scary! This is what I was afraid of when hunting with my friend and her family when I was 14. Only thing is, there were no trees in the middle of the desert. Originally posted by 1bluebox:

    i'd like to suggest you not chop the roll even if it takes a lifetime to complete

    If I don't chop it, I'm afraid no one will ever see the completed scroll. Haven't really decided what I'm going to do except to keep working on it. Maybe I'll leave instructions to have it donated to a museum or something. But then, I'm not really a known artist so a museum might not be interested.

  20. PainterWoman says:

    Originally posted by studio41:

    I love Eucalyptus…

    Me too Jill. The Silver Dollar kind. I used some of the leaves as a reference for a mono-print, a picture of which is in my printmaking album. I used the leaves in a watercolor and an oil painting as well.

  21. studio41 says:

    will you post these?

  22. PainterWoman says:

    monoprint with eucalyptus leavesThere is other artwork with leaves in it but I have not photographed them.

  23. ricewood says:

    I truly think this is a wonderful project

  24. PainterWoman says:

    Thank you Allan.

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